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Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc.: Creating Power for Corporations at the Cost of Changing Women’s Lives

The Burwell v. Hobby Lobby decision has now opened the door for business corporations to be identified as “persons.” This type of identification allows for the corporations to be recognized in connection with a particular religious faith. This holding has enabled corporate entities to acquire more power than ever before. And giving this authority to corporations has led to opting out of the contraceptive mandate and thus further admonished the health care rights that are given to many female employees employed through Hobby Lobby stores. The power that is now in the hands of business corporations may have drastic impacts on the future of businesses and their employees. The women who work amongst the thousands of male employees of Hobby Lobby stores, Conestoga, and Mardel, will consequently feel the impact of such changes. The importance of the contraceptive mandate was overlooked and the people behind large for-profit corporations fail to see the benefit of promoting public health and gender equality.  Furthermore, this also disregards the probability of many negative repercussions this decision may have on women in the work field, the unemployment rates, the power that is overhauling corporations and taking away from the health of their employees, and the impact on a society filled with women in the work force. Thus, making it necessary to analyze this decision, the background of the decision makers, and the possibility of future ramifications. Is this decision going to change women’s rights in the land of the free? How much power can the corporate moguls gain while simultaneously diminishing the rights of their employees? This “power,” given to for-profit corporations, holds many changes in the future of large corporations and their employees, alongside the impact of the success of their businesses and the repercussions of the employees in the long run.

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